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Top Five Free Camping Spots on the East Tassie Coast

Tasmania’s east coast is sprinkled as liberally with free camping spots as it is with natural wonders, so to aid you in your travels we’ve collated a list of five stunning locations for you to explore.

If you’re looking for some memorable free-camping experiences, east Tassie has plenty to offer – especially throughout the coastal areas. Varying between locations that will immerse you in the beauty of the natural landscape, or parking you conveniently behind pubs or cafes, east Tassie does not fail to deliver. Before you embark on your free-camping adventure, prepare for the journey with Hema’s Where to Camp Guide with comprehensive site listings and detailed maps that aid you on your trip. 

 

Bay of Fires, Swimcart Beach

The renowned Bay of Fires free campgrounds is one of the most scenic campgrounds in Tasmania, and Swimcart Beach is a popular spot for all adventurers. Blissful white sand beaches, turquoise blue water and stunning headlines offer idyllic surroundings. The chance to see natural wildlife – including kangaroos, wallabies, wombats, echidnas, possums and even sea and forest birds – will keep intrepid explorers, both large and small, busy. A fair number of campsites can be found throughout the dunes, ranging from grassy to sandy to sheltered. Visitors can stay for up to four weeks. Drinking water and firewood must be brought in for the course of your stay, and all rubbish must leave with you. The grounds are dog-friendly and are accessed via Binalong Bay Road out of St Helen’s and Gardens Road. 

 

Friendly Beaches, Freycinet National Park

For travellers heading towards Freycinet National Park, the Friendly Beaches campgrounds at Isaacs Point are worth the stopover. Campsites are tucked cosily throughout the coastal scrub and are suitable for tents, caravans and campervans. With something for everyone, from beautiful white sand perfect for strolling, to humpback whale spotting, fishing, swimming or surfing, Friendly Beaches are true to their name. And in the evenings, sit back and enjoy the striking colours of the granite as the sun sets. The campgrounds offer basic pit toilets, but there is no fresh water available. Due to its location within a national park, there are no dogs or campfires allowed, however, gas and fuel stoves can be used (except on total fire ban days). Stays of up to two weeks are welcome, and the grounds can be found 19km north of Coles Bay. 

 

The Pondering Frog, Bicheno

Offering short-term camping for fully self-contained vehicles only (no tents allowed), The Pondering Frog can be found on the highway, a mere 400m from the Freycinet National Park turnoff. With the additional bonus of being a premium cafe and ice creamery, The Pondering Frog offers stays of up to 48 hours for no set charge – however, donations can be placed in the red donation box found behind the welcome sign as you enter. Great for a quick stopover and something to eat, the site also has a children’s playground. To get there, head south along the Tasman Highway from Bicheno and you’ll find the site 400m from the Coles Bay turnoff.  

 

Spring Bay Hotel, Triabunna

An easy one-hour drive north-east of Hobart, the Spring Bay Hotel offers a memorable stay within the picturesque fishing town of Triabunna. With a large grassy paddock behind the hotel open for short-term stays, Spring Bay Hotel is the perfect spot for setting up a tent or caravan – although fully self-contained vehicles are preferred. Stays are free of charge, but donations are welcome to support to local volunteer organisations. The Spring Bay Hotel offers the perfect home base to explore the town and is located in ideal proximity to the ferry to Maria Island. A toilet block can be found in the parkland fronting the marina; however, no showers are available. The site does not allow campfires but is pet friendly. All rubbish – yours and the pet’s – must be disposed of before you leave. Bins can be found along the marina in front of the hotel. 

If you’re looking for some memorable free-camping experiences, east Tassie has plenty to offer – especially throughout the coastal areas. Varying between locations that will immerse you in the beauty of the natural landscape, or parking you conveniently behind pubs or cafes, east Tassie does not fail to deliver. Before you embark on your free-camping adventure, prepare for the journey with Hema’s Where to Camp Guide with comprehensive site listings and detailed maps that aid you on your trip. 

 

Bay of Fires, Swimcart Beach

The renowned Bay of Fires free campgrounds is one of the most scenic campgrounds in Tasmania, and Swimcart Beach is a popular spot for all adventurers. Blissful white sand beaches, turquoise blue water and stunning headlines offer idyllic surroundings. The chance to see natural wildlife – including kangaroos, wallabies, wombats, echidnas, possums and even sea and forest birds – will keep intrepid explorers, both large and small, busy. A fair number of campsites can be found throughout the dunes, ranging from grassy to sandy to sheltered. Visitors can stay for up to four weeks. Drinking water and firewood must be brought in for the course of your stay, and all rubbish must leave with you. The grounds are dog-friendly and are accessed via Binalong Bay Road out of St Helen’s and Gardens Road. 

 

Friendly Beaches, Freycinet National Park

For travellers heading towards Freycinet National Park, the Friendly Beaches campgrounds at Isaacs Point are worth the stopover. Campsites are tucked cosily throughout the coastal scrub and are suitable for tents, caravans and campervans. With something for everyone, from beautiful white sand perfect for strolling, to humpback whale spotting, fishing, swimming or surfing, Friendly Beaches are true to their name. And in the evenings, sit back and enjoy the striking colours of the granite as the sun sets. The campgrounds offer basic pit toilets, but there is no fresh water available. Due to its location within a national park, there are no dogs or campfires allowed, however, gas and fuel stoves can be used (except on total fire ban days). Stays of up to two weeks are welcome, and the grounds can be found 19km north of Coles Bay. 

 

The Pondering Frog, Bicheno

Offering short-term camping for fully self-contained vehicles only (no tents allowed), The Pondering Frog can be found on the highway, a mere 400m from the Freycinet National Park turnoff. With the additional bonus of being a premium cafe and ice creamery, The Pondering Frog offers stays of up to 48 hours for no set charge – however, donations can be placed in the red donation box found behind the welcome sign as you enter. Great for a quick stopover and something to eat, the site also has a children’s playground. To get there, head south along the Tasman Highway from Bicheno and you’ll find the site 400m from the Coles Bay turnoff.  

 

Spring Bay Hotel, Triabunna

An easy one-hour drive north-east of Hobart, the Spring Bay Hotel offers a memorable stay within the picturesque fishing town of Triabunna. With a large grassy paddock behind the hotel open for short-term stays, Spring Bay Hotel is the perfect spot for setting up a tent or caravan – although fully self-contained vehicles are preferred. Stays are free of charge, but donations are welcome to support to local volunteer organisations. The Spring Bay Hotel offers the perfect home base to explore the town and is located in ideal proximity to the ferry to Maria Island. A toilet block can be found in the parkland fronting the marina; however, no showers are available. The site does not allow campfires but is pet friendly. All rubbish – yours and the pet’s – must be disposed of before you leave. Bins can be found along the marina in front of the hotel. 

 

Ben Lomond National Park

Heading away from the coast, the free bush campground in Ben Lomond National Park is a wonderful way to experience the eastern region of Tasmania. Spotted with lowland gums and mountain pepper bushes, the campground is only several kilometres below the summit and has six generously sized sites that are suitable for tents or caravans. With no bookings available, the campgrounds operate on a first-come-first-serve basis. The facilities on offer include toilets, picnic tables and fireplaces – with firewood included. The campgrounds are accessed via the C401. But be aware – the drive up Jacob’s Ladder to reach the ski field at Ben Lomond is a challenging journey, with steep switchback turns and through the winter months of June and September requires snow chains.

Heading away from the coast, the free bush campground in Ben Lomond National Park is a wonderful way to experience the eastern region of Tasmania. Spotted with lowland gums and mountain pepper bushes, the campground is only several kilometres below the summit and has six generously sized sites that are suitable for tents or caravans. With no bookings available, the campgrounds operate on a first-come-first-serve basis. The facilities on offer include toilets, picnic tables and fireplaces – with firewood included. The campgrounds are accessed via the C401. But be aware – the drive up Jacob’s Ladder to reach the ski field at Ben Lomond is a challenging journey, with steep switchback turns and through the winter months of June and September requires snow chains.

1 comment

  • DALE CLARKE: September 20, 2022

    How about leaving a map to show just where you mean these campsites are located.? Or did I miss that part of the article keep up the good work.

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